My Bookshelf – Late Summer 2015

I read a fair amount of non-fiction over the summer so for the first time have divided up my bookshelf post into fiction and non-fiction sections.

FICTION

Eastern Standard Tribe by Cory Doctorow

Another tech-head, conspiracy theory thriller in the vein of Homeland which I wrote about in my last bookshelf post. I enjoyed this one and again it offered a chance to think about different issues around emerging technologies such as privacy. This was all wrapped up in an interesting, not-too-distant-future scenario with Doctorow’s sharp, hip dialogue.

Treachery by S.J. Parris

Well I read another one in the Giordano Bruno series despite giving these a mediocre review in a previous blog. Why? Well they’re entertaining and pretty interesting to read if you’re a history nerd like me. This one centres on Portsmouth, the Spanish naval threat in 1585 and a rival English expedition to the New World to get some of those Spanish riches. Bruno and Sir Phillip Sidney get wrapped up in a murder and ensuing complicated plot which threatens to derail the expedition.

The Axeman’s Jazz by Ray Celestin

I picked this up from the library after reading the blurb. It is set in Prohibition era New Orleans and is based on a real life serial killer nicknamed the Axeman because, you guessed it, he killed with an axe. The novel explores race, poverty and class as we follow a mixed race teenage girl and Italian-American ex-cop who are both unofficially investigating the murders (a young Louis Armstrong also makes a semi-convincing appearance). Celestin’s style is very good and he paints a vivid if grim picture of a gritty, vibrant city.

Wolf Hall by Hillary Mantel

After seeing the BBC series of this recently I decided to give the book another go. I’d been recommended Mantel before and leafed through this in the library but found the modern sounding dialogue a bit jarring coming from the mouth of Henry VIII. Well I really enjoyed it upon a full reading. Wolf Hall follows the rise of Thomas Cromwell from blacksmith’s son to Archbishop Wolsey’s fixer to Henry’s privy council. Mantel creates a contemplative atmosphere that still manages to be warm. I can’t quite put my finger on it, something to do with her use of first, that’s not quite first, person… Anyway, go and read.

NON-FICTION

Single, Married, Separated and Life After Divorce by Dr. Myles Munroe

Another recommendation that I read to support a family member going through a divorce. Munro talks a lot of sense and debunks many myths about relationships from our culture (you’re not complete if you’re single, marriage will solve all your problems). Probably the most radical concept was that you need to be single no matter what your relationship status. Go read it to find out more.

Taking God at His Word by Kevin DeYoung

I was recommended this book and the following one in preparation for a seminar session I was doing for the Christian youth summer camp that we volunteer at in Wales. I’d read DeYoung’s Just Do Something which was excellent and I still reference it when people are dilly-dallying about decisions! Taking God at His Word is an evangelical exposition about the Bible and why we should believe and obey it. He goes into the theology and Christian doctrines about the Bible, but all in readable English. Highly recommend it.

Can I Really Trust the Bible? by Barry Cooper

Short, pocket-sized evangelical book that addresses the question of the title. Topics such as the manuscript evidence for the Bible, textual criticism, eyewitness evidence and how the Biblical canon we have was established are covered. Again a highly readable book that has the benefit of being very short and to the point.

I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

Wow, what a powerful story. This is a memoir/autobiography telling the story of Malala Yousafzai, the girl’s education campaigner and Nobel Peace Prize winner (and also the life of a teenage girl in Pakistan). She weaves in the history of Pakistan and her native Swat Valley and gives an account of what life was like under the Taliban. Both depressing – because of the seeming political impotence against terrorism – and inspiring, I highly recommend this.

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